Peru hop- Cusco, Arequipa, Nazca, Huacachina, Paracas

So having spent a delightful month in Cusco where we had to do no thinking or planning whatsoever, we were in lazy mode and opted to use Peru hop to get us to Lima. It’s basically a tour, but it is a hop on hop off bus and you can participate as much as you like. Weighing up our hatred of even short tours with the aforementioned laziness we signed on, really swayed by the low cost and the fact in took in everything we wanted to do and absolutely nothing extra. Pretty perfect. Except it was still really just a tour and we felt trapped and fed up and everyone else on it really liked tours (read as ‘weren’t as independent as us’, I’m a travel snob now).

So that being said, after being an hour late picking us up we started, overnight to Arequipa. We had one day by ourselves to mosey around before we were picked up for an overnight tour of nearby Colca Canyon. Arequipa will relish to us as the city of pigeons (for the possibly thousands in the main square) rather than the white city (for the gleaming buildings) as it is traditionally known. We had a really nice day eating at the market, watching children play with/attack the pigeons, and making chocolate in a bean to bar chocolate makers.

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The trip to the canyon takes in a wildlife reserve where we saw many many vicuñas, alpacas and llamas, making up for the horribly early start. Our final coca tea of the trip was enjoyed to bolster our bodies against the altitude and then we arrived in the canyon and had a walk through local villages. The following day we went deeper into the canyon to admire more of the incan terraces and still very traditional villages, and maybe purchase some handicrafts before we arrived at the condor viewing point where we were very lucky to see more of the massive birds that everyone is very proud of. We also tried a super sour cactus fruit called cansayo; surprisingly I quite liked it and egg wouldn’t finish his half.

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Also I bought a hat.

We then went to Huacachina via a short stop at the NAZCA lines, this is what we saw:

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Huacachina is an oasis in the desert, kind of a party town actually, and the only activity is sandboarding. The dunes here are renowned for being huge and we were both really excited to have another go at sand boarding. Also included was dune buggying, which we naively assumed was just transport to the good dunes; in reality it was the most adrenaline inducing thing ever, in the whole world. And completely terrifying. Kind of like a roller coaster but without the safety. On the first massive drive my sunglasses flew off on impact and therefore I spent the rest of the journey blind to our trip and only knowing when to scream because of everyone else’s screams. And at one point the buggy got stuck and had to be pushed out by us. The sand boarding itself was awesome, the dunes are indeed huge, so big that sometimes you have to go down on your belly, super fun.

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We also went to a pisco vineyard and tried lots of pisco and found out about how it is made.

From here the next stop was Paracas, the setting of point for the Islas Ballestas/poor man’s Galapagos. We were desperately hoping to see blue footed boobies but alas no, need the real Galapagos for that. We did see many seals, sea lions and penguins though. We tried our first authentic Peruvian ceviche here as well, which was fresh and delicious, pleased we didn’t have it in Cusco. There was also a trip to Paracas nature reserve, where the desert meets the ocean and it was pretty spectacular.

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The final stopping point was hacienda San Jose; an old old family home which you can tour to suicide the history of slave trafficking and get an insight into rich Peruvian lives. It was really interesting and I even got to flex my Spanish muscles as I knew words or translator didn’t thanks to all our farm work!

Seven days later, many things seen, tour over, and we arrive in Lima, safe and sound.

Also, I lost my hat.

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